In spite of the distance from KMC,  
the Normandy beaches are a must-see
for most WWII enthusiasts. Plan a
three  to four day trip, and click on
the buttons for more information.

The area of  WW2 historical interest
extends 84 kms from Caen to St.
Mere Eglise. Travel in the area is slow
due to tiny roads, confusing signs, and
traffic so allow plenty of time.  
There's no shortage of fascinating
historical sites and it'll take a
minimum of two days to cover the
American sector alone. Really, there's
plenty to keep history nuts busy for a
week.

A little reading prior to visiting
Normandy will enhance your
understanding of this area, and
resources are listed on the left.  If
time is short, several reputable
companies offer DDay tours that
eliminate the hassle and provide an
excellent overview for those with
money to spend.

Be prepared for windy and drizzly
weather year round, coupled with
stingy central heating in
accommodations. Rain gear, sturdy
shoes/boots, and warm clothes are
advisable regardless of the season.  
Summer visitors can swim on Omaha
beach and experience the irregular
sand bars, tides, and currents for
themselves. Even summer weather
can be chilly, though, so be prepared.
Omaha Beach
TOURING THE DDAY BEACHES
Special thanks to the DDay Veterans who have shared their personal and
often painful memories with us. Al, Gale, Stuart, Irving, Norm, Arnold,
Harold, and all the rest - you are heroes in our eyes.
Accomodations Near the DDay
Beaches
A Suggested Agenda for Your
Visit
29th Infantry veteran Gale
Garman at the 60th anniversary
ceremony. Gale landed in the
second wave on Omaha Beach
and fought his way across Europe.
With him is Abby Shields, who
met him through an oral history
project on DDay.  Mr Garman
died in March 2011, still in touch
with his buddies from DDay.